Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Сегодня в лингафонном кабинете... Unit 2 Week 2 Elementary Russian

Привет! Добро пожаловать! 

Welcome! 

ММММММММедведь! Bear! (This image came from Tolstoy's Primer... his schoolbook for peasant children in the 1870s. It made WAY more money than Anna Karenina or War and Peace!)

In Russian, the phrase добро пожаловать is used when welcoming someone, say, to your home or at an event. On the other hand, с приEздом means literally something like "greetings on your arrival"--it implies that someone has just arrived safely at his or her destination, so it's reserved for welcoming someone at the airport... 

Take your quiz, get it graded, then do these brief listening exercises on the back of the quiz:

First, listen carefully to the numbers 20-50. They should be familiar, as they're just compound numbers like in English (twenty-two). The new word here is сорок--forty in Russian. 

Got 'em? Поняли? Итак... listen to the телефонные номера, the telephone numbers. and jot them down on the lab хендаут. These six digit telephone numbers are read as three sets of numbers--in other words, "twenty-six/thirty-one/fifteen." Notice also that the speaker gives both the person's "full name" and their nickname, Надежа и Надя. On the back of your quiz, jot down the person's nickname and phone number, and let me or the tutor check it! Only do the first SIX!!! Ask us for help if you need it...



Now, take a second and carefully look through this Power Point. It explains how modifiers are formed in Russian. Yeah, it's a lot of information. It will make more sense when you actually work through examples... soooo... At the tables, grab a хендаут and, working with a partner, a tutor, or me, start the homework (Oral Drill 11 & 13). 


Don't forget next week's GRAMMAR quiz. Here's a link to part I (numbers) of the material on that quiz; here's a link to part 2 (modifiers). Note: The material is part of a Memrise course. You don't have to use Memrise, though I think it's an excellent program (and it's cross-platform, so there's OS, Android, etc. versions). But you may adapt the data as you see fit... You can cut and paste the tables into other programs, like Quizlet, or make your own flashcards with paper and pen. 

Adding: Some students are having trouble in forming the adjectives. Remember! 1) Only chumps add endings to endings. You need the STEM. What's the stem? Whatever isn't the ending. What's the ending? Anything that changes. So, consider some of the adjectives from our unit:


новый. новая. новое. новые. The stem is нов-
старый. старая. старое. старые. The stem is стар-

Don't forget how the possessives like мой, твой, наш, and ваш work. Because their masculine ending is "nothing," their stems and their masculine forms are identical: 
мой. моя. моё. мои. (мой- + -а --» моя; drunk monks!)

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